Sorbet Mag

Sorbet Mag

As the real estate industry continues to adapt to changes in the market, alternative methods of buying and selling homes are becoming more prevalent. Hiring an agent to list on the MLS is no longer the only way to sell a property, as “off-market selling” is becoming a real option for homeowners seeking a faster, more streamlined, and ‘safe’ sale.

The benefits of an off-market home sale include the convenience of not having to prepare the home for sale, no repair costs to the seller because the home is sold ‘as-is’, no failed escrows/shorter close, all cash/no financing offer, and little to no physical contact with buyers or others for showings or inspections. An off-market sale can also help eliminate the very real health risks and exposure concerns involved in a traditional listing.

Off-market buyers are typically smaller “mom and pop” investors looking for homes to either “fix and flip” or rent out, or more institutional iBuyers (instant Buyers) who make offers on homes online. Unlike the traditional process, these buyers purchase homes As-Is, directly from homeowners. The off-market buyer offers a lower price than the seller may be able to net with a listed sale but allows the seller to avoid the inconvenience and investment of time and money for repairs/prep costs, since the buyer is purchasing the property in ‘as-is’ condition.

With these alternative options now available, it is crucial for any home seller considering such a sale to understand how to navigate through the off-market process. An off-market buyer should clearly outline their process, answer any seller questions, and provide transparency throughout the transaction. Unwillingness of an off-market buyer to provide information about closing timeframes, proof of funds, contingencies, contracts, and other details, should be a red flag warning to a home seller.

Senior Home Purchase Program, based in San Diego since 2015, is a real estate investment company with a unique, niche service offering senior homeowners a transparent, streamlined, and guaranteed way to sell their home off-market. Siblings Rob Perkins and Corinne Ross created SHPP after a decade in real estate investing, and after experiencing the challenges involved in helping grandparents move. SHPP purchases homes directly from seniors transitioning into senior living communities, and “guarantees a certain sale, at a certain price.”

SHPP purchases the home in its current condition, allows the seller to leave behind clutter and unwanted furniture, and covers 100 percent of any costs associated with the sale. “In addition to saving the homeowner an incredible amount of time, and greatly reducing their stress, SHPP offers the best price possible to our senior home selling clients. We are transparent in illustrating how an SHPP offer differs from a traditional offer,” explains Perkins. “With no hidden costs or fees, our off-market offer is very compelling to the homeowner.”

“SHPP also provides a flexible timeline for moving,” adds Ross. “Our seniors are often in a position where they don’t know the exact date of their move into a community,” she shared. “This can be very stressful, so we provide flexibility with closing dates, as well as a leaseback option if needed.”

Transparency, integrity, and client comfort level are top priorities for SHPP. “Most of our customers are referrals, so the trust factor is big for us,” Ross explains.  A former client shared, “Their honesty, transparency, and diligence made me feel completely comfortable with them. The process was exceptionally easy and stress-free.”

Perkins and Ross emphasize another benefit to sellers: “SHPP’s process can alleviate many of the concerns and stresses of selling that have arisen during the pandemic. Our goal is to offer a certain, safe, and stress-free solution to our clients during this very uncertain time, and we are thrilled to now be servicing Orange County, as well as other areas, as we continue to expand to help our senior customers.”


PastedGraphic 34Donna Hunnicutt,
Market Manager OC
(714) 923-7477
westviewSHPP.com

By Becky Lomaka, MA, CT
Director of Grief Support and Education O’Connor Mortuary

It’s been a rough few weeks since my last column. My family and I have experienced heartbreaking losses that have me in a tangled emotional overload.

In mid-August, a friend’s daughter was killed in an automobile accident, a beautiful life taken much too young. Just a few days later we found out our dear friend of twenty-five years had only a few weeks to live, the cancer we thought was gone from his body came back with a vengeance. He died over Labor Day weekend. On the same day we found out about our friend’s cancer coming back, I got the devastating news that my cousin’s three-year-old son has been diagnosed with Duchene Muscular Dystrophy, a rare and fatal disease will slowly rob him of his muscle function. Couple this is with the anniversary of my brother’s death seven years ago and the pain that surrounds this horrible date year after year since he has died. It’s made me ponder the thought that endings are not always happy, sometimes they are just plain hard.

Grief, no matter how recent or how long ago the loss, has a way of painfully flooding our entire being. I was talking with a friend whose daughter died 21 years ago; as the date of her death nears so does the resurgence of the raw and gut-wrenching grief my friend experienced in the early months after her daughter died. Then I think about my cousin and try to wrap my head around how she can even comprehend the diagnosis given to her sweet toddler and the bucket list that has suddenly filled her soul with what she needs her son experience while he can still walk, use his upper limbs, and breathe on his own, as this horrible disease slowly ravages his body.

Sometimes when we experience multiple losses within a short period of time, it can result in a fog that can be hard to find our way out of. In our grief, there are days with no silver linings; it’s about just making it through the day, loving those still with us and trying to find gratitude for time we had with those we love.

What if we chose not to avoid those days, those triggers, those moments and instead walked toward them...walked toward our grief and made space for it in our life rather than shutting it out? What if allowing ourselves to feel our grief actually helps lift us out of that fog and blur of pain?

Just the other day I had the privilege of listening to a young father eulogize his infant daughter who died at birth. He talked about the blessings his sweet baby brought to so many people; how he and his wife’s lives were changed forever in such a positive way. How this baby’s life story, as short as it was, was a gift. His words struck me. It’s okay to allow myself to withdraw, to turn inward and simply sit with my sadness and pain; by doing this I also create a space to let the world back in again.

Barbara Karnes, the American hospice pioneer and Registered Nurse, said it beautifully, “The present moment sounds easy, but, of course, it’s not. It takes lots of practice. If we can be more in the present moment, at ease with life as it unfolds, maybe our final act of living will be filled with more and better memories.”

Sometimes we need to let go and realize we are not in control. Life doesn’t always give us happy endings, yet we can make the most of the beginnings and the middles, cherishing those moments along the way.


IMG 0569O’Connor Mortuary
25301 Alicia Parkway
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
(949) 581-4300
www.oconnormortuary.com

Sarah Sanders wasn’t shocked when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41 in September 2015. In fact, she expected it.

Dr Wade SmithDr Wade SmithThat’s because Sanders has a strong family history of the disease on her father’s side. Her paternal grandmother died at age 35 from breast cancer, an aunt passed away at age 50, and another aunt was diagnosed in her 60s and successfully treated. This knowledge made all the difference in Sanders’ approach to her breast health.
“Call it whatever you believe in, but this was put on my heart at a very young age,” she said. “I sort of always knew this was coming for me, and I do not mean that in a negative way. I mean it in an ‘I need to be proactive’ way. Maybe it’s my grandmother – maybe she’s my guardian angel.”

One thing that made all the difference in her breast cancer care was her choice of board-certified medical oncologist, Wade Smith, M.D., who specializes in breast cancer treatment at City of Hope Newport Beach. After her tumor was removed, Dr. Smith performed cutting-edge genomic testing that determined chemotherapy wasn’t necessary. Sanders said that when Dr. Smith told her the news, it was the only time she cried.

“He represents everything City of Hope stands for,” Sanders says of Dr. Smith, Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research.

I am with the institution that’s going to have the most cutting-edge technology and advanced medical science. City of Hope is the place to be.” – Sarah Sanders

City of Hope Newport Beach is home to many of the nation’s leading clinician scientists who are transforming laboratory breakthroughs into treatments to offer the best hope for patients. Recognizing that each cancer is unique, City of Hope Newport Beach assembled a roster of outstanding researchers and physicians with highly focused knowledge. For breast cancer patients, that includes breast surgical oncologist Hang T. Dang, D.O., and nurse practitioner Linda Buck, herself a breast cancer survivor.

Sanders says she appreciates the environment of City of Hope Newport Beach as well as the staff, whom she describes as the “best in the field.” Sanders now lives in Indian Wells with her boyfriend, Curtis, and their 14-year-old dog, Bridget, but says she can’t imagine receiving care anywhere other than City of Hope.

Sanders is approaching the five-year mark in her cancer journey, and she recognizes how important it is that her tumor was discovered early. Sanders’ family history caught the attention of her OB/GYN, who referred her for genetic and other testing. Sanders learned that she had the ATM mutation that increased her cancer risk. Then an MRI revealed a small tumor in its early stages, close to her armpit, that may not have been caught with a traditional mammogram. Because of the gene mutation and her family history, Sanders chose to have a double mastectomy.

Recuperating from the procedure was challenging. For Sanders, the most “life-changing aspect” of breast cancer was letting someone else take care of her – specifically, her mom, Teri, who basically moved into Sanders’ home to help her.

“I reconnected with her in a massive way,” Sanders said. “We still laugh when we talk about her trying to give me a shower. But she would wash my hair, and we would just laugh.”

Sarah SandersSarah Sanders

Between the mastectomy, reconstructive surgery, and a hysterectomy, Sanders had six surgeries within one year. During this time, she was referred to Jeffrey Weitzel, M.D., a City of Hope clinical geneticist who studies the ATM mutation and took her care “to a level no one else can match.”

“First, it made me aware of other cancer risks I have because of the mutation,” Sanders said. “More important is the peace of mind, knowing my care is with the ‘A’ team. I am with the institution that’s going to have the most cutting-edge technology and advanced medical science. City of Hope is the place to be.”

Sanders urges people – especially those with a family history of breast cancer – to take advantage of City of Hope’s personalized and highly specialized care.

“There is a massive difference when you are being monitored by a compassionate, technologically advanced cancer center like City of Hope and detecting cancer early,” Sanders said. “That’s my battle cry.”

Infinity Medical and Wellness offers a tremendously successful treatment option - FDA Cleared and Covered by Medicare and Most Major Medical Insurances

Are you or a loved one suffering from chronic pain caused by peripheral neuropathy? Do you experience pain, numbness, burning, tingling, or tightness in your hands and feet? Have you tried multiple therapies and medications (i.e. Gabapentin, Cymbalta, Lyrica and Neurontin) only to experience side effects and with little to no relief?

5bc62fe4b6ba2a4b34ee49e0 img neogen5bc62fe4b6ba2a4b34ee49e0 img neogenWould you like to try a natural treatment that is covered by insurance?

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NerveDamageNerveDamageDepending on your coverage, YOUR TREATMENT COULD BE LITTLE TO NO COST TO YOU. The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to recover sufficiently varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed physical exam.

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Logo 50Logo 50Infinity Medical and Wellness
25301 Cabot Road, Suite 103
Laguna Hills
(949) 751-1007
InfinityMedicalandWellness.com

City of Hope understands its patients need them more than ever. That’s why they are continuing to provide lifesaving treatments while doing everything they can to keep patients safe.

With decades of experience in treating and protecting patients with cancer, City of Hope is among the nation’s most prepared organizations to help patients through the COVID-19 crisis – and is one of the best and safest places to receive cancer care. City of Hope Newport Beach continues to provide lifesaving treatment while taking every measure necessary to protect patients, families, and staff.

“Patient health is our number one priority and our COVID-19 protective measures are an extension of the high-quality care we provide,” says Tingting Tan, M.D., Ph.D., a medical oncologist at City of Hope Newport Beach who specializes in thoracic cancers. “We remain focused on protecting our patients and their loved ones while making sure they get the care they need.”

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Since cancer patients are particularly vulnerable to infection, protecting them means that safety measures need to start before they arrive at the front door. With limited exceptions, visitors need to wait for patients outside the building during this crucial period. Visitors are welcome to walk with patients, or bring wheelchairs, to the door, where staff greets them and begins the check-in process.

City of Hope recognizes the importance of involving family in your visits and treatments during this time. There are several ways visitors can participate in appointments. Patients can conference them in on a video call or a phone call while they’re in the doctor’s office, or the doctor can come outside the building before or after the appointment to speak with the patient and visitor together.

If you’re a patient, here are some other ways you’ll be protected when you come in for an appointment:

As you enter the lobby, the first thing that will happen is a temperature check. It’s quick and easy. A staff member will hold an infrared thermometer to your forehead to make sure your temperature is under 100 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll receive a colored wristband that lets everyone that you’ve been cleared for temperature.

You won’t be surprised to learn that you will also be given a mask. Masks are one of the best ways to shield each other from respiratory droplets, so every patient receives a medical grade mask to wear for the duration of their appointment; you can be certain that our staff also will be wearing masks at all times. If you brought your own mask, you may continue to wear it underneath the mask we provide.

Patient health is our number one priority and our COVID-19 protective measures are an extension of the high-quality care we provide …

Next stop: the reception desk, for the normal check-in process. You’ll find the waiting area inviting and safe, with signs posted asking that social distancing be maintained, and seating that has been appropriately spaced.

If you have a physician appointment, you’ll wait on the first floor for a medical assistant to take you back for your visit. If you have come for an infusion, an additional temperature check will be performed when you arrive at the second-floor infusion clinic. Everyone in the clinic wears a face mask and either a face shield or goggles, and gloves are worn by every clinician providing infusion care. In addition, every infusion bay is physically distanced.

To further ensure safety, City of Hope frequently and meticulously sanitizes all areas of the facility, including but not limited to waiting rooms, hard surfaces, and high-traffic and high-touch areas. Hand sanitizing stations are located throughout the building.

Patients can take comfort in City of Hope’s continued commitment to provide them with exceptional cancer care.


City of Hope is a safe place for world-class cancer care. To make an appointment with a physician at City of Hope Newport Beach, please call (949) 763-2204. For more information, please visit cityofhope.org/OC.

My colleague and mentor, Dr. Bill Hoy, and I have been doing several virtual grief workshops over the past few months since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

We’ve talked with funeral directors, hospice clinicians and healthcare professionals, educators, faith leaders, and the community at large. One thing that has struck us are the familiar questions, concerns and fears that are almost universal amongst these diverse groups of individuals. Some common themes include how to provide support and care with new regulations and restrictions, how to be present for others while managing our own fears, how to keep ourselves healthy and safe, concern about what the future will hold, wonder about how long things will “be this way”, and a general sense of uneasiness about the uncertainty of our world.

Much like the grief we experience when someone we love and care about dies, the loss- stacking we have experienced both individually and collectively as a community has left many people feeling uncertain and anxious. Yet fear, uncertainty and discomfort can be our compass for growth.

The truth is... we were never guaranteed certainty; not now and not before COVID-19, protests and riots. I talk with grieving people whose lives have changed in an instant. None of us are promised tomorrow.

We tend to grieve like we live. Dr. Ken Doka, a leading expert and author on death and bereavement, examines styles of grief. Intuitive grievers experience grief in waves of feeling while instrumental grievers are more likely to talk calmly and describe more physical symptoms of their grief. There is no right or wrong, no better way to grieve. Most of us fall somewhere on this spectrum of intuitive and instrumental grievers. Dr. Doka goes on to state that there are differences not deficiencies. There is no best way to grieve. We all approach it differently, and that is okay.

Just like everyone grieves differently, we all react to stress and uncertainty differently. Have compassion for others who may be at a different point in coping from where you are right now. The level of anxiety each of us feels now and how we are able to cope with it, mirrors our ability to cope with anxiety prior to the unrest we’ve felt in our world and communities over many recent weeks. Internalizing the uncertainty is what creates our anxiety.

So, what CAN we do to manage the uncertainty we feel?

Make a mindset shift: expect change. As Greek philosopher, Heraclitus wrote “Change is the only constant in life.” Focus on what you can control, rather than what you cannot. Limit your news intake, move your body, eat healthy foods, get enough sleep, build in time for relaxation, and practice being in the moment. Notice your emotions and reactions. Allow yourself to feel all emotions and try not to label them as “good” or “bad”, rather “I’m feeling overwhelmed” or “I’m feeling scared” or “I’m feeling like I’m moving forward”. Know the facts and challenge your self-talk. As Dr. Hoy states, “facts override fear”. The more information we have, the better we are able to manage and cope with our fears.

I leave you with this inspiring quote from Dr. Maya Angelou that is so perfectly apropos for the time in which we are living: “A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” What a beautiful thought...in the midst of uncertainty, go out into the world and sing your song.


IMG 0569IMG 0569O’Connor Mortuary
25301 Alicia Parkway
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
(949) 581-4300
www.oconnormortuary.com

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, what kinds of precautions is City of Hope Newport Beach taking to keep patients safe, and what can you expect when you visit?

With decades of experience in treating and protecting patients with cancer, City of Hope is among the nation’s most prepared organizations to help patients through the COVID-19 crisis – and is one of the best and safest places to receive cancer care. City of Hope Newport Beach continues to provide lifesaving treatment while taking every measure necessary to protect patients, families, and staff.

“Patient health is our number one priority and our COVID-19 protective measures are an extension of the high-quality care we provide,” says Tingting Tan, M.D., Ph.D., a medical oncologist at City of Hope Newport Beach who specializes in thoracic cancers. “We remain focused on protecting our patients and their loved ones while making sure they get the care they need.”

DrDrSince cancer patients are particularly vulnerable to infection, protecting them means that safety measures need to start before they arrive at the front door. With limited exceptions, visitors need to wait for patients outside the building during this crucial period. Visitors are welcome to walk with patients, or bring wheelchairs, to the door, where staff greets them and begins the check-in process.

City of Hope recognizes the importance of involving family in your visits and treatments during this time. There are several ways visitors can participate in appointments. Patients can conference them in on a video call or a phone call while they’re in the doctor’s office, or the doctor can come outside the building before or after the appointment to speak with the patient and visitor together.

If you’re a patient, here are some other ways you’ll be protected when you come in for an appointment:

As you enter the lobby, the first thing that will happen is a temperature check. It’s quick and easy. A staff member will hold an infrared thermometer to your forehead to make sure your temperature is under 100 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll receive a colored wristband that lets everyone that you’ve been cleared for temperature.

You won’t be surprised to learn that you will also be given a mask. Masks are one of the best ways to shield each other from respiratory droplets, so every patient receives a medical grade mask to wear for the duration of their appointment; you can be certain that our staff also will be wearing masks at all times. If you brought your own mask, you may continue to wear it underneath the mask we provide.

Next stop: the reception desk, for the normal check-in process. You’ll find the waiting area inviting and safe, with signs posted asking that social distancing be maintained, and seating that has been appropriately spaced.

If you have a physician appointment, you’ll wait on the first floor for a medical assistant to take you back for your visit. If you have come for an infusion, an additional temperature check will be performed when you arrive at the second-floor infusion clinic. Everyone in the clinic wears a face mask and either a face shield or goggles, and gloves are worn by every clinician providing infusion care. In addition, every infusion bay is physically distanced.

To further ensure safety, City of Hope frequently and meticulously sanitizes all areas of the facility, including but not limited to waiting rooms, hard surfaces, and high-traffic and high-touch areas. Hand sanitizing stations are located throughout the building.

Patients can take comfort in City of Hope’s continued commitment to provide them with exceptional cancer care.


Cancer hasn’t stopped for COVID-19, and neither has City of Hope. To make an appointment with a physician at City of Hope Newport Beach, please call (949) 763-2204. For more information, please visit cityofhope.org/OC.

How the Young Can Help

“Mary,” a City of Hope patient and a 70-something grandmother from Beverly Hills, worries that COVID-19 and the calls to practice social distancing may actually make things worse for many seniors who already lack the close personal connections they desperately need.

“I just wish that people would not think that older people are invisible or incompetent,” she said. “I think that many of us seniors are very isolated and lonesome.”

“Eleanor,” another patient in her 80s, lives a few miles away. She feels the same, with an added concern: quickly getting up to speed on the latest technology.

“I am trying to stay positive and be kind. Not to say that it always works for me,” she said. “I had a real meltdown last week, prompted by my frustrations with the computer, the new reliance on Zoom and other sites that I find difficult to deal with.”

As we all adapt to the new normal of sheltering in place and keeping our distance, experts say older Americans need extra care and vigilance, not only for medical reasons but for emotional ones too. People over 60 have diminished immune systems, putting them at greater risk of contracting COVID-19 and suffering more if they do.

Many seniors may also have underlying health conditions — such as cancer, diabetes or cardiovascular disease — that can make a bout with this virus more dangerous.

But it’s the risk to seniors’ mental and emotional well-being that most concerns William Dale, M.D., Ph.D., director of City of Hope’s Center for Cancer and Aging Research and chair of the Department of Supportive Care Medicine. It’s also why he dislikes the term “social distancing.”

“Those two words should never be together,” he said. “The key is physical distancing. You mustn’t stop being social. We need to maintain emotional connections even if we can’t be physically close, because isolation can be a terrible thing, leading to depression and cutting folks off from the help they need.”

Dale wants to see all people — young and old — increase their connections to one another, taking advantage of available technology, matching it to each person’s capabilities. Not every older adult can figure out a Zoom video conference, for example, but there’s no reason not to pick up the phone and talk to them, or send an email. To reach the un-savvy, anti-tech types, Dale recommends a secret weapon.

“Use the grandkids!” he said. “Ask them to check in” with grandma and grandpa, and watch what happens. “The grandparents will be motivated to learn the new technology to stay connected with the kids.”

And whenever possible, find ways to maintain face-to-face interaction. Perhaps hugs and kisses can’t happen right now, but seeing friends and loved ones from 6 feet away and with other proper precautions can still mean a lot.

“Mary” and her family have figured this out.

“When one grandchild came home [from an overseas trip], she stood on the sidewalk and we were on the porch so we could share love and throw kisses,” she said.

And “Eleanor” makes a point of reaching out.

“We must dig into ourselves and find more love to give away, especially at this time,” she said, “So I decided to give gifts to someone twice a week, like a delivery of pizza or fruit, and to send at least two emails or phone calls every day to friends.”

Importance of Connection

Dale knows from personal experience — as a young resident at a VA hospital and in his current City of Hope job — the importance of personal contact. He remembers how disappointed some of his outpatient older veterans would be when he’d tell them, “You’re doing OK, no need to come in this week.”

“I was stunned,” he recalled, by the way they’d argue, ‘But I do need to see you! I need to talk to you!’

“It took me a while to recognize just how important it was to them to make a regular connection.”

William Dale, M.D., Ph.D., director of City of Hope’s Center for Cancer and Aging Research William Dale, M.D., Ph.D., director of City of Hope’s Center for Cancer and Aging Research He encounters similar challenges as City of Hope attempts to balance the infection risks of close contact with the emotional needs of each individual patient. Who should come in? Who can be better served with a telemedicine session? Who should get a home visit by a nurse? The staff uses a special assessment to help make those decisions, analyzing each patient’s unique needs and vulnerabilities, including the strength of their social networks and support systems.

Dale feels a heightened sense of responsibility now, in the face of this crisis, more determined than ever to do the right, meaningful thing for each patient. He hopes the day never comes when care is narrowly “triaged,” with seniors’ chronological age and physical condition placing them at the back of the line. “Disadvantages must never become a reason or excuse to further disadvantage people,” he said.

Do These Three Things

He’s urging every older person to do three things, right now:

“First,” he counseled, “if you do go out, remember that physical distance. Second, find ways to remain emotionally connected to friends and family. Don’t be afraid to reach out. Don’t worry about ‘bothering’ them. They want to hear from you. And third, identify what brings you peace in these anxious times — walking, meditation, whatever works for you.”

He has another list for young people with elders in their lives.

“Give a call, check in, make a visit, not in an infantilizing way, but in a ‘Hey, how you doin?’ way. Reminisce with them. Sharing happy memories goes a very long way. And if you haven’t already, run through their medical scenarios. Do they have all the medications they need? Enough food? Their doctors’ phone numbers? Make sure.”

One last thing. Dale wants all of us to carefully think about our actions, because they will matter for a long time.

“Let’s have a sense of the moment,” he advised. “This is a historic event.

“How will we feel, six months from now, based on what we do today?”


City of Hope, a world-renowned cancer research and treatment center, recently opened a location in Newport Beach. City of Hope plans to invest $1 billion to develop and operate a state-of-the-art comprehensive cancer care and network of care in Orange County. To make an appointment with a physician at Newport Beach, call (949) 763-2204.

Bringing a Different Kind of CBD Company to Consumers

An exciting new CBD company has emerged, capturing market share in the crowded CBD space. Isolate Pure CBD is making a name for itself, not only because of the way they make and market their CBD, but primarily because of the people who make up the company.

From marketing executives, entertainment company heads, professional athletes and college students to diamond dealers, a superfood expert and a physician for the NFL, Isolate Pure CBD is backed by a wealth of well educated and experienced professionals to bring a different kind of CBD company to consumers.

Isolate Pure CBD as a company has one common dominator and that is they all use CBD and for the most part, for different, wide-ranging reasons including insomnia, workouts, pain, arthritis and anxiety.

Taking in all of the important issues of health, the opioid crisis, climate crisis and sustainability issues of today, Isolate Pure CBD has focused on where to grow, how to grow, how to harvest and how to deliver CBD.

Isolate product familyIsolate product family

Isolate Pure CBD is cultivated in the lush Kentucky heartland by dedicated farmers where hemp has been grown successfully since the 1700’s. They sustainably farm premium hemp-derived CBD products in an FDA registered and inspected GMP-Compliant faciity, All of their products are tested by third parties for safety and quality. With that said, they are now working to make consumers as safe and knowledgeable about CBD as they can.

Simultaneously, Isolate Pure CBD is working on a medical study that will help accurately prescribe CBD for a myriad of health issues ranging from anxiety, inflammation, headaches, epilepsy to insomnia, arthritis, gut health, chronic and acute pain. They are working to publish the first medical paper on how best to use CBD for all of these health issues.

Dr. Gazzaniga, who serves on Isolate Pure CBD’s Board of Advisors states that “we are in the early stages of looking at CBD for acute pain treatment in order to reduce or eliminate the need for opiates.”

Isolate Pure CBD currently has four products they have released for public use: 50 mg. CBD capsules that are full spectrum; full spectrum oil droppers that come in both 500mg and 1000mg; a topical cream in a pump form that is 500mg; and lastly, an incredible acne treatment cream that combines Manuka honey and CBD.

You can find and order all of these products online at www.isolatepurecbd.com or you can call 800-284-1293 to order by phone.

Isolate Pure CBD is currently working on additional proprietary products as an alternative to using opioids and for college and professional athletes. They are working to have these products available in 2020.

A Q & A with Kristy Fleming, MD, FAAD
Board-Certified Dermatologist and Mohs Surgeon

Question: Why is fall the season for dermatology?

Answer:

1. Weather

In truth, many dermatologic treatments are technically a form of very controlled skin damage. Damage activates the bodies innate repair system to replace old injured cells with new healthy cells, generate collagen, and restore fragmented elastin. Temperate fall weather provides a much more comfortable healing environment than the summer heat of Southern California.

2. Untanned Skin

Lasers are incredibly powerful exact devices designed to target a precise wavelength (color). Be it brown sunspots on the face, red vessels around the nose, or hair on the legs, the laser treatment is most safe and effective when there is the greatest differentiation between your skin color and the desired target.

3. Sun avoidance

One of my favorite treatments is photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT is a medical procedure that clears pre-cancers (so usually covered by Medicare/most insurance companies), but also provides an excellent cosmetic result.

However, this treatment requires strict sun protection. I tell my patients: “Pretend you are allergic to the sun. Better yet, pretend you are a vampire.” Even a quick jaunt to the mailbox without appropriate sun protection will leave you feeling like your skin is on fire!

DJS 65072

4. The Holiday Rush

The holidays are quickly approaching and everyone is eager to look their best for visiting family and annual parties. This is our busiest time of year for cosmetic treatments and appointment availability can be scarce. Nevertheless, we can almost always accommodate a “Botox emergency.”

Quick tip: If you have a big event, we recommend scheduling your cosmetic procedure at least 2 weeks prior in order to ensure you’re looking your best!

The holidays also mean schools are on break. This is a great time for kids and college students to catch up on their skin issues without having to miss school or incur additional travel expenses.

5. Insurance Woes

Unfortunately, medical insurances dictate much of our ability to treat our patients. Some patients are losing their insurance at the end of the year, while others have met their extremely high deductible and are anxiously trying to have any outstanding procedures performed before the deductible is reinstated anew. We understand these concerns. Our office stays open during winter break and we frequently extend our hours, but we definitely recommend scheduling your appointment as soon as possible.

Question: Now that summer is over, are we safe to put away our sunblock until next year?

Answer: Definitely not! Don’t be fooled by overcast skies, clouds are poor protection from harmful UV rays. I’ve treated many patients with severe sunburns who mistakenly believed sunblock was unnecessary without sunshine.


Fleming Dermatology & Aesthetic Center
23141 Moulton Parkway, Suite 110, Laguna Hills
(949) 916-5956 | FlemingDerm.com

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